Helping Your Child Adjust to Learning from Home

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Schools across the country are shutting down for the next several weeks. The important thing is to make sure your children do not treat this as a prolonged break. Learn more about how you can help your child successfully transition to this time at home.

Learning From Home

If this shift might cause problems with your student due to a lack of resources, check in with your child’s teacher or school to see what resources they have available so your child does not fall behind academically.

Even if your child does have all of the resources to access the material online, e-learning can present other challenges. School provides an enriching social experience, built-in scheduling, and an established format for students to ask questions. Without these norms, it may be difficult for students to focus on schoolwork when they have easy access to their smartphone and other more appetizing options.

Learning from Home for older students

Help your child adjust by creating an atmosphere that’s more akin to a school than home. Like we advised in our Tips for Working From Home blog post, set your child up in an atmosphere that limits distractions but is also comfortable for them while they watch lessons and do homework. When your student needs a break, let them grab a snack, text with friends, or take a prolonged lunch break to decompress from schoolwork. Try and keep your student on as much of a schedule as possible. If you have a student who is a bit older, you can even work together with them to create an at-home schedule so they feel like they have some input and ownership.

Learning from home for younger students

This can be more difficult for younger students and you may have to stay more on top of them to watch online lessons, help them with logging in to multiple programs, or answering their questions regarding class material.

Depending on their age, you may even have to find other ways to keep your child engaged by having them download books from the local library. Several companies are offering free e-learning programs in the wake of coronavirus to help parents and children with this new reality. Scholastic is offering free courses for students from pre-kindergarten to grades 6 and higher. For other free online programs, check with your child’s teacher.

Easing the anxiety of learning from home

There will likely be growing pains for both you and your child as you transition to e-learning. As the rest of the nation continues to grapple with the pandemic, it is difficult to forecast how long your student will be learning from home. If you have any questions about how to talk to your child about the coronavirus, the CDC has a great guide to help answer your child’s questions and help alleviate any anxiety they are feeling. Another way to help with these feelings of anxiety and uncertainty is by engaging in physical activity.

Getting exercise is a great way to break up the monotony of your child’s day. Go for a walk outside on a trail or around the neighborhood. Boosting your physical well-being can help both you and your child focus on work. We also have a blog post on at-home exercises.

Staying informed

It’s uncertain how long this will last as school administrators continue to develop plans for the coming months in alignment with recommendations from health and government officials. Find the best way to communicate with your child’s teacher or other school officials so you can stay informed about procedures or other resources to help you and your student.

We will continue to provide helpful tips and information regarding the coronavirus. Check out Aprilaire.com for more information regarding Aprilaire Products to create a Healthy Home.

 

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