airborne transmission

AA Homepage Articles | Healthy Air |

Airborne Transmission of Coronavirus

3 minute read

Airborne Transmission in Tight Spaces

Medical professionals from the preeminent organizations on public health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization have started changing their stance that COVID-19 is airborne. This is important news. Prior to this, doctors hypothesized that COVID-19 was transmitted by droplets larger than aerosols and primarily through contaminated surfaces.

Unlike these heavier droplets, airborne diseases can be picked up in airstreams, can travel farther than heavier droplets, and require different prevention strategies.

For the sake of comparison and understanding, heavier droplets are like a bowling ball and smaller airborne droplets are like a ping-pong ball. The wind or airstream is going to have a greater impact on redirecting a ping-pong ball than it is a bowling ball. Subsequently, airborne droplets can be caught up in the airstream and recirculated throughout a poorly ventilated building. This recent development has fast-tracked the recent requirement for wearing masks while indoors.

A New York Times model shows how these droplets can spread from you to others around you.

Loud and Crammed Indoor Spaces

Loud and crammed indoor spaces like bars are also more vulnerable to airborne transmission. People are congregating in tight spaces and because of the noise levels; they have to talk louder thus expelling droplets more rapidly and forcefully.

The same thing can be said about weddings, church services, birthday parties, and funerals. These settings usually have people talking, singing, laughing, and crying in small indoor spaces leading to a higher chance of transmission and infection. Many of these same principles extend to office spaces, schools, healthcare settings, and other indoor places with large gatherings that require face-to-face communication.

For safe social gatherings, health professionals recommend heading outdoors. Despite the infinite amount of ventilation provided by the outdoors, droplets can still start concentrating after a long enough time of talking, laughing, etc. increasing the possibility of infection. For this, health professionals recommend staying distanced, moving, limiting guests, and wearing a mask.

If you are not staying in the same spot, like moving through a grocery store or walking, then your rate of infection decreases. Doctors are concerned with the dosage of droplets that leads to infection. As of the publication of this blog, doctors have not specified a dosage rate required for infection.

Asymptomatic Superspreaders

Doctors are also still exploring the differences between super-spreaders and less efficient spreaders. Superspreaders can rapidly spread coronavirus to others even if they are asymptomatic.

To help deter infections by asymptomatic superspreaders, cities and states are implementing mask mandates for indoor spaces since they help filter out larger droplets and can reduce spread. Many major retailers like Target, Walmart, Kroger, and Aldi are also requiring masks in stores, even if the local government has not mandated it. Many other retailers have erected Plexiglas barriers between shoppers and workers. Check with your local store to see their current mandates.

Detering Airborne Transmission with an Air Filter

Besides those physical barriers, another weapon to combat airborne transmission is an air filter. An air filter can capture these small particles and trap them, limiting their spread. MERV 16 filters capture up to 96% of virus-sized airborne particles and virus-sized airborne particles*.  The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers recommends a minimum MERV rating of 13 to neutralize airborne viruses.

Using these filters in conjunction with an air purifier, helps you quickly change out the air. This process helps reduce the spread of airborne viruses. Filters are critical in helping capture those droplets circulating in the airstream. They do not have a 100 percent success rate and virus-laden droplets can still circulate even with an air purifier.

Along with our precautionary measures, air filters do help in limiting the spread of airborne viruses whether it is a whole-home or portable system.

Experts are also still trying to determine how long the virus lives on surfaces. This determines the risk involved in changing out those virus-filled air filters.

Protecting yourself against COVID-19 and other airborne viruses require a multi-part approach. Social distancing, frequently washing hands and surfaces, shielding your mouth and nose with a mask, and installing an air purifier are the best methods to keep you and your family safe.

Healthy Air System™

Aprilaire also offers a multi-part approach to indoor air quality in your home. This approach helps protect against airborne viruses and other airborne pollutants like mold, mildew, dander, and odors.

Along with air filtration, we recommend humidity control and fresh air ventilation to best attack those indoor air quality issues as part of our Healthy Air System™. This suite of solutions uses humidity control to impact those airborne pollutants’ living environment. Air filtration and fresh air ventilation combine to capture airborne pollutants and bring in fresh air to reduce the proliferation of airborne viruses.

Medical professionals are still learning more about this novel virus. Until there is a vaccine, it is best to take as many precautions to protect yourself and your family. You can help protect yourself by wearing a mask, social distancing, and washing hands and surfaces frequently. This virus has a mortality rate of around 3 to 4 percent and for those that have recovered; it can have long-lasting health impacts as it attacks your heart and brain. To stay-up-to-date, continue to monitor your local and state health department, and follow CDC guidelines.

Healthy Air Is on the Way

Find an Aprilaire professional near you.

AA Homepage Articles | Healthy Air | Wellness |

Airborne Viruses and Healthy Air

3 minute read

At Aprilaire we believe healthy air is essential – especially in your home. The coronavirus pandemic has brought indoor air quality to the forefront as you and your family are spending far more time in your home.

Healthy air is all we do at Aprilaire, and as the industry leader we want to take this opportunity to share information with you on how to create healthy air in your home. More than ever we feel a responsibility to spread the word on the importance of healthy air in the home, the science behind how a home’s air system works, and proven, best-practice healthy air solutions.

Unfortunately we do not have cure for the coronavirus, but Aprilaire does offer solutions to help prevent the proliferation of airborne viruses and other air quality issues in your home

We support the findings and recommendation of ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) that the most effective way to prevent proliferation of airborne viruses is by installing a whole home Healthy Air System containing 3 essential elements: Air Filtration, Humidity Control and Fresh Air Ventilation.

These components are designed to work with your heating and air conditioning equipment to create a healthy air environment in your home by introducing healthy, fresh air into your home, maintaining a level of humidity that helps prevent the proliferation of viruses, and helping to remove airborne dust, allergens, bacteria, and viruses.

Air Filtration

Proper filtration of both the air in your home and incoming ventilation air is key to removing particulates from the air.

According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM)the coronavirus nominally has a particle size of 0.13 microns and most airborne viruses range from 0.03 to 0.3 microns.

Aprilaire MERV 16 Allergy & Asthma Filters provide the highest rate of effectiveness. They can capture up to 96%* of airborne particles the size of viruses.

Our whole-home Aprilaire 5000 Electronic Air Cleaner is an effective product to capture airborne viruses. It is up to 90%* efficient at trapping airborne virus-size particles.

Healthy Humidity Solutions

Proper Humidity reduces the transmission of viruses. ASHRAE promotes keeping humidity between 30-60% to minimize virus survival rates.

Aprilaire provides humidifier products such as the 600, 700, and 800 and the 1850 dehumidifier to help keep the home between this optimal range.

Fresh Air Ventilation

Having a properly functioning whole-home ventilation system is critical to maintaining a healthy home environment. Fresh air is not only clean and refreshing but ventilation also helps dilute and remove contaminants.

Homeowners should use a ventilation system to bring in fresh air from the outside to dilute stagnant indoor air. The air inside the home can be up to 5 times more polluted than the air outside. Products such as the Aprilaire Model 8126X Ventilation System or Model 8140 Fresh Air Ventilator bring in the recommended amount of fresh air. They also have patented control logic to minimize energy usage. Coupling these systems with our IAQ thermostats allows homeowners to easily adjust the amount of fresh air being brought (into) your home.

Whole-Home Product Control

The Aprilaire whole-home products work with our IAQ thermostats to provide easy user experience and control through the thermostat and Aprilaire app.

Professional

Help combat airborne viruses and particulates in the home with Aprilaire Products. Our products are not only manufactured in the United States, but our engineers and manufacturers maintain the highest standards in design and assembly.

Aprilaire products are professionally installed and serviced by Healthy Air Partners. To help find the perfect Healthy Air product for your home, go to our Find A Pro page to locate a dealer in your area.

Please note:

Aprilaire products are not intended to cure or treat any known airborne viruses but can help in the reduction of airborne viruses in your home.

*Contaminates removed based on air passing through the filtering system.

 

AA Homepage Articles | News |

Experiencing the Fight For Air Climb

2 minute read

Before the Fight For Air Climb

Entering the US Bank Center for the American Lung Association’s Fight For Air Climb was a rush of energy.

This seemed less like an arduous trek up 1,000 stairs and more of an indoor festival. There were volunteers ready to greet you and pump you up for the ensuing climb and people from different companies sitting at tables ready to hand out souvenirs.

They were probably also there to distract you after you just got done instinctively looking up toward the top of the 47-story US Bank Center in downtown Milwaukee becoming a little uneasy at the prospect of your journey upward.

Before you made your climb, you gathered as a team and took several escalators down to the basement level before getting warmed up with a quick aerobic routine. Then you took a long and winding tunnel where you greeted by more volunteers who were cheering you on. It was hard not to feel inspired and excited.

During the Fight For Air Climb

One-by-one people took off up toward the top of the US Bank Center to begin their Fight For Air Climb. I, like most, started off confidently and quickly. I took the first six flights easily, but then by flight eight, I began to fight for air. I now understand why they title this climb just that. My mind and my body were at odds. I couldn’t decide whether I wanted to continue at the same pace to get it over with as quickly as possible or to slow down and feel better. I went with the former.

Everyone in the stairwell was trudging onward with the same dilemma. We all were gasping for air as we kept pushing up each step and each flight toward the top of the Fight For Air Climb. At several points, I wondered if I was actually making any progress.

Every 10 flights there was a group of volunteers handing out cups of water and words of encouragement. Both were sorely needed to help push me along.

With each passing flight, I kept a tally of how many flights I had left. Twenty flights down, 27 more flights to go; 30 flights down, 17 flights to go; Ok, 40 flights down, 7 to go. By the time I got to the 40th floor, I knew I could make the last push to make it to the top of my Fight For Air Climb journey.

After the Fight For Air Climb

Eventually, I reached the top after 9 minutes and 31 seconds. At the top of the stairwell, I was met by volunteers who were cheering me on and by other climbers who were also catching their breath and taking in the picturesque views of Milwaukee and Lake Michigan afforded to us by the tallest building in Wisconsin.

As I grabbed a water and walked around soaking in both the views of the city and my accomplishment, it was really cool to watch teams taking pictures together or greeting other climbers with high-fives and smiles. There was a certain camaraderie found in a common struggle.

Despite the lingering soreness, I cannot wait for next year’s climb. No matter if I beat my time from this year or not, it’s about fighting for air together and helping those impacted with lung disease.

To join an upcoming climb in a city near you, visit www.lung.org/aprilaire.

Environment |

Summer’s Most Common Bugs

2 minute read

When it comes to a love of humidity, humans and pests are on opposite ends of the spectrum. While we tend to despise air that is thick with heat and water vapor, most bugs actually thrive in it and need it to live.

Unfortunately, this means that the impending summer humidity in certain parts of the country is about to bring these summer pests out in a big way.

Summer’s Most Common Pests

Cockroaches

The German cockroach is the most common roach species infesting our homes in North America. They are attracted to warm and humid places, making your kitchen and the water heater in the basement their most frequented hideaways.

Silverfish

These small, wingless insects are nocturnal and need to keep their bodies moist at all times in order to survive. You are likely to find them beneath boxes or furniture in your basement, the shower, or hiding in your kitchen.

Centipedes

Carnivorous and nocturnal, with their 100 feet, these pests can move quickly and spend most of the day hiding in humid, secluded places. They are highly attracted to the moist, humid parts of the home because they need to rehydrate constantly in order to live.

Earwigs

Known to burrow into topsoil outside, these nocturnal bugs can also infiltrate dark and humid areas of your home. You are most likely to find them around floor drains, bathrooms, or under rugs or furniture.

Roly-Poly Bugs

Also known as pill bugs, sow bugs, potato bugs, or armadillo bugs, these bugs often infest damp basements.

Tips to Prevent/Eliminate Summer Pests:

Healthy Home |

Professionals Needed: Here Are The Home Projects You Should Never DIY

2 minute read

So you bought your first house and can’t wait to rip up that crummy carpet. Go for it! But if you hit dirt, you might need to call in backup. As more millennials take the plunge into home ownership, it’s becoming more and more common to see DIY projects big and small. Things like carpet removal are doable. But no matter how many tips and tricks you’ve picked up from HGTV, Pinterest, or YouTube, there are some projects that simply aren’t worth the money, time, or risk to do yourself.

Setting Limits on DIY Home Projects

Skill Level for DIY Home Projects:

For some people, DIY is a way of life. For the rest of us, we need to be honest about our skills and level of experience. Sometimes a “simple” job can actually be a lot more complex than it appears. Hire a professional for these projects before you try it yourself and make a mistake that costs way more to fix.

  • Paving your driveway
  • Custom kitchen and bathroom jobs – backsplashes, flooring, countertops
  • Pest removal
  • Window Installation

Time Commitment for DIY Home Projects:

Some home improvement jobs can take weeks to complete when you try to do them yourself. For big projects, hiring a professional will mean a quicker and more efficient job done well so you can get back to enjoying your home without interruptions.

  • Large landscaping projects
  • Flooring
  • Demolition

Permission for DIY Home Projects:

Some home improvement projects require permits due to building codes. Save yourself the headache, and possible code violation, by hiring a professional who’s familiar with the process when it comes to these types of jobs.

  • Additions and remodels
  • Deck or patio addition
  • Major electrical/plumbing work
  • Pool installation and repairs

Safety Risk for DIY Home Projects:

If there’s any question of your ability to do something without injury or structural damage to your home, it’s most definitely a job for a professional.

  • Mold, asbestos, lead removal
  • Tree removal
  • Roof and foundation repairs
  • HVAC system installation and repair

When you’ve decided you need a pro, try to keep the process simple to save you time and headaches. Start by reaching out to a few trusted contractors in your area to get estimates on the work, (recommendations from friends are a great place to start) and then consider price and professionalism before making your decision.

When it comes to HVAC work, we make it easy to find a pro. Along with plumbing and electrical work, HVAC is an area where it’s crucial to get the job done right the first time.

Sources:

https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/millennials-take-on-diy-projects-with-more-confidence-and-budgeting-discipline-than-previous-generations-300813538.html

https://www.familyhandyman.com/smart-homeowner/10-home-projects-you-should-always-hire-a-pro-for/

https://www.ahs.com/home-matters/quick-tips/8-household-projects-to-leave-to-professionals/

https://www.rd.com/home/improvement/diy-home-improvement-projects/

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/projects-you-should-not-diy_n_3923456

https://www.hallerent.com/blog/when-to-call-professional-for-home-improvement-repairs/

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OAS

AA Homepage Articles | Wellness |

Foods That Can Trigger Ragweed Allergies Causing OAS

2 minute read

Oral Allergy Syndrome

Are you one of the 23 million Americans who suffer from a ragweed allergy? Ragweed is everywhere in the U.S., especially in eastern and midwestern states. Its season starts late in July and early August and ends in mid-October. This common allergen can feel impossible to escape. While a ragweed-producing plant typically lives for only one season, each plant can release up to 1 billion pollen grains that have the potential to travel great distances on the wind. And being outside on a day with elevated ragweed counts isn’t the only way you might be affected. It can also travel into your home on the foods you eat causing Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS).

Foods and Oral Allergy Syndrome

“Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS) is a form of a contact allergic reaction that occurs upon contact of the mouth and throat with raw fruits or vegetables. The most frequent symptoms of OAS include itchiness or swelling of the mouth, face, lip, tongue, and throat. Symptoms usually appear immediately after eating raw fruits or vegetables, although in rare cases, the reaction can occur more than an hour later…OAS can occur at any time of the year.”

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology

Foods that may cause OAS in a person with a ragweed allergy include:

  • Banana
  • Cantaloupe
  • Honeydew melon
  • Watermelon
  • Chamomile tea
  • Cucumber and zucchini
  • Honey that contains pollen
  • Sunflower seeds
  • White potato

Eating these foods, especially during allergy season, can result in any of the following symptoms:

  • Itchy throat/tingling sensation
  • Watery eyes
  • Stuffy nose
  • Swollen lips

How to Avoid OAS

In order to manage your OAS symptoms, it’s important to avoid eating any of these foods raw. Baking, cooking, or microwaving food reduces cross-reactions because the high temperatures break down the proteins that cause OAS.

Peeling foods before eating helps remove the high concentration of proteins found on the skin. And canning your fruits and vegetables or eating canned produce can also limit your reaction.

Talk to your doctor if you experience any adverse reactions when consuming raw fruits and vegetables. They can help you identify your allergies and learn how to avoid them.